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Posts for tag: dental implants

By Paul E. Marcuz, DDS, PC
October 09, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
ImplantsCanProvideEffectiveOptionsforTotalToothReplacement

Losing all your teeth can dramatically impact your life for the worst. Fortunately, we can give you your "teeth" back. The most common way, at least until a few decades ago, is with custom dentures, which reasonably restore life-like appearance and dental function. But it does have one major drawback—it can't stop bone loss.

Loss of bone in the jaws often occurs with missing teeth. Normally, the bone continuously generates newer cells to replace older ones that have died. Chewing stimulates this growth as the force generated travels up through the teeth to the bone. But when teeth go missing, new bone growth slows, eventually causing the bone's volume and density to decrease.

Dentures can't reactivate this lost stimulation, and so bone loss may continue. Dentures even accelerate this loss as the compressive forces applied to the bony ridge are detrimental. This often leads to a "loosening" of a denture's fit that can make them uncomfortable and less secure to wear.

Today, however, patients with total tooth loss have another option that could alleviate the problem of bone loss—dental implants. Since their inception forty years ago, implants have become the preferred method of both dentists and patients for tooth replacement.

Implants consist of a titanium metal post that's surgically imbedded into the jawbone. Bone cells are attracted to this particular metal, readily multiplying and adhering to the implant's titanium surface. Because of this, an implant can slow or even stop bone loss.

Most people are familiar with the single tooth implant with an attached lifelike crown. Although this use of implants could be used to restore total tooth loss, it can be quite costly replacing over two dozen teeth individually.

But implants could still be part of the answer for someone with complete tooth loss, because they can also be used to support traditional restorations. A few implants strategically placed around the jaw can support either a removable denture or a fixed bridge.

Besides being a cost-effective way to add support to these traditional tooth replacements, the inclusion of implants will likely decrease continuing bone loss. Most importantly, it can give you back your dental function—and your smile to boot.

If you would like more information on dental implant options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “New Teeth in One Day.”

By Paul E. Marcuz, DDS, PC
September 29, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
4ReasonstoConsiderDentalImplants

Along with fessing up to cherry tree surgery and tossing silver dollars across the Potomac River, George Washington is also famously known for wearing wooden dentures. Although we can't verify the first two legends, we can confirm Washington did indeed wear dentures, but not of wood—hippopotamus ivory and (yikes!) donated human teeth—but not wood.

Although they seem primitive to us today, Washington's dentures were the best that could be produced at the time. Still, the Father of Our Country suffered mightily from his dentures, both in physical discomfort and social embarrassment. Regarding the latter, our first president's dentures contorted his lips and mouth in an unattractive way, faintly discernable in Gilbert Stuart's famous portraits of our first president.

If only Washington had lived in a later era, he might have been able to avoid all that dental unpleasantness. Besides better versions of dentures, he might also have benefited from an entirely new way of replacing teeth—dental implants. Just four decades after this state-of-the-art restoration was first introduced, we now recognize implants as the "Gold Standard" for tooth replacement.

In recognition of Dental Implant Month in September, here are 4 reasons why dental implants might be the right tooth replacement choice for you.

Life-like. While other restorations provide a reasonable facsimile of natural teeth, implants take like-likeness to another level. That's because the implant replaces the root, which then allows for a life-like crown to be attached to it. By positioning it properly, implants and the subsequent crown can blend seamlessly with other teeth to create an overall natural smile appearance.

Durable. Implants owe their long-term durability (more than 95% still functioning after ten years) to a special affinity between bone and the titanium post imbedded in the jaw. Bone cells readily grow and adhere to the implant's surface, resulting over time in a more secure hold than other restorations. By the way, this increased bone growth around implants can help slow or even stop progressive bone loss.

Low impact. Dental bridges are another well-regarded tooth replacement option, but with a major downside: The natural teeth on either side of the missing teeth gap must be crowned to support the bridge. To prepare them, we must permanently alter these teeth. Implants, though, don't require this form of support, and so have a negligible effect on other teeth.

Versatile. Although implants are a practical choice for individual tooth restorations, multiple teeth replacements can get expensive. Implants, though, can also be incorporated into other restorations: Four to six implants can support an entire removable denture or fixed bridge. Implant-supported restorations are more durable than the traditional versions, while also encouraging better bone health.

If you need to replace teeth and would like to consider dental implants, see us for a complete examination. You may be an ideal candidate for this "best of the best" dental restoration.

If you would like more information about dental implants, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants.”

By Paul E. Marcuz, DDS, PC
August 20, 2020
Category: Oral Health
WhyYouShouldStillFlosswithanImplant-SupportedBridge

Losing teeth to tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease is never easy. But with implant-supported bridgework, you can regain lost function and appearance with a restoration that could last for many years.

Don’t think, though, that dental disease woes are a thing of the past with your new implants. Although your restoration itself can’t be infected, the supporting gums and underlying bone can, often through bacterial plaque accumulating around the implants. The bone that supports the implants could deteriorate, dramatically increasing your chances of losing your restoration.

It’s essential, then, that you keep the area between the bridge and gums clean of plaque through daily hygiene. This definitely includes flossing around the implants.

Flossing with an implant-supported bridge will be different than with natural teeth: instead of flossing between teeth you’ll need to thread the floss between the bridge and gums. Although this is a bit more difficult, it can be done with the help of a floss threader, a device with a loop on one end and a long, thin plastic point on the other—similar to a sewing needle.

To use it, thread about 18” of floss through the loop and then pass the threader’s thin end first through the space between the bridge and gums toward the tongue until the floss threader pulls through. You can then take hold of one end of the floss and then pull the threader completely out from beneath the bridge. Then, you wrap the ends around your fingers as you would normally and thoroughly floss the implant surfaces you’re accessing. You then release one end of the floss, pull out the remainder, rethread it in the threader and repeat the process in the next space between implants.

You also have other hygiene tool options: prefabricated floss with stiffened ends that thread through the bridge-gum space that you can use very easily; or you can purchase an interproximal brush that resembles a pipe cleaner with thin plastic bristles to access the space and brush around the implants.

Some patients also find an oral irrigator, a handheld device that sprays a pressurized stream of water to loosen and flush away plaque, to be an effective way of keeping this important area clean. But that said, oral irrigators generally aren’t as effective removing dental plaque as are floss or interproximal brushes.

Whatever flossing method you choose, the important thing is to choose one and practice it every day. By keeping bacterial plaque from building up around your implants, you’ll help ensure you won’t lose your restoration to disease, so it can continue to serve you for many years to come.

If you would like more information on caring for your dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

WhatYouShouldKnowAboutAntibioticTherapyBeforeImplantSurgery

Placing a dental implant within the jawbone requires a surgical procedure. For most people it’s a relatively minor affair, but for some with certain health conditions it might be otherwise. Because of their condition they might have an increased risk for a bacterial infection afterward that could interfere with the implant’s integration with the bone and lead to possible failure.

To lower this risk, dentists for many years have routinely prescribed an antibiotic for patients considered at high-risk for infection to take before their implant surgery. But there’s been a lively debate among health practitioners about the true necessity for this practice and whether it’s worth the possible side effects that can accompany taking antibiotics.

While the practice still continues, current guidelines now recommend it for fewer health conditions. The American Dental Association (ADA) together with the American Heart Association (AHA) now recommend antibiotics only for surgical patients who have prosthetic heart valves, a history of infective endocarditis, a heart transplant or certain congenital heart conditions.

But patients with prosthetic joint replacements, who were once included in the recommendation for pre-surgical antibiotics, are no longer in that category. Even so, some orthopedic surgeons continue to recommend it for their joint replacement patients out of concern that a post-surgical infection could adversely affect their replaced joints.

But while these areas of disagreement about pre-surgical antibiotics still continue, a consensus may be emerging about a possible “sweet spot” in administering the therapy. Evidence from recent studies indicates just a small dose of antibiotics administered an hour before surgery may be sufficient to reduce the risk of infection-related implant failure with only minimal risk of side effects from the drug.

Because pre-surgical antibiotic therapy can be a complicated matter, it’s best that you discuss with both the physician caring for your health condition and your dentist about whether you should undergo this option to reduce the infection risk with your own implant surgery. Still, if all the factors surrounding your health indicate it, this antibiotic therapy might help you avoid losing an implant to infection.

If you would like more information on antibiotics before implant surgery, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implants & Antibiotics: Lowering Risk of Implant Failure.”

Implant-BasedRemovableDenturesaGoodChoiceforPatientswithExtensiveBoneLoss

People who’ve lost all their teeth (a condition known as edentulism) face a decision on how to restore their lost function and appearance. And there are a number of options to consider.

A fixed bridge supported by dental implants, for example, is a good choice for patients who still have sufficient bone structure in their jaw. It’s not a good choice, however, for those with the opposite situation — who’ve experienced significant bone loss which has also affected their facial structure. For them, there’s a better alternative that also uses implants for support — the overdenture.

An overdenture is similar to a traditional denture, in that it’s made of life-like crowns permanently set in denture plastic, and may either partially or fully cover the roof of the mouth. The main difference, though, is that unlike traditional dentures which rest for support on the gum ridges, an overdenture is supported by strategically placed implants that the denture fits over and connects to — hence the name “overdenture.”

There are a number of advantages for an overdenture, especially for patients with bone loss. A removable, implant-supported denture can be designed to replace lost tissues that have altered facial appearance — to “fill in” the face and restore aesthetic harmony. Patients who’ve previously worn dentures will also often find their speech better improved than with fixed bridgework.

Because it’s removable, an overdenture and the underlying gums are easier to clean, which helps inhibit disease and lessen further bone loss. It also allows you to properly care for the denture, which can extend its longevity and reduce future potential maintenance and replacement costs.

If you would like to consider removable overdentures as an option, you should begin first with a thorough oral exam that includes evaluating the status of your bone, jaw and facial structure. From there we can advise you if overdentures are the best choice for you.

If you would like more information on overdentures and other restoration options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fixed vs. Removable.”